NETWORK CARDS

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NETWORK CARDS

Postby smeeagain » Sat May 04, 2013 11:37 am

I have been told by Tech Support that my Network Card (Realtek) may not be capable of handling the higher download speeds. I only seem able to manage around 250mbps at present.

Any recommendations for a replacement please ??
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Re: NETWORK CARDS

Postby EddieVH » Tue May 07, 2013 4:16 pm

Laptop or desktop?
What model is your current Realtek?
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Re: NETWORK CARDS

Postby smeeagain » Fri May 10, 2013 5:58 pm

Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller
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Re: NETWORK CARDS

Postby BourneWeb » Tue Jun 04, 2013 11:36 pm

How have you got on with speeding things up?

I've found there's many things can affect your download speed. The network card is of course important, but if your pc can't keep up you again have a bottle neck.

If you have a second pc, you could try connecting it directly to the router also and simply passing a large file from one to the other via a share. This is fairly easy using windows home group. A test like that would eliminate the Gigler network from the equation and then you can be sure the problem is with your pc.

You might also want to consider using a cat6 patch cable. A good cable is important to get those high speeds. You can get these cables on eBay for under £10.

Use ie10 for your speed tests.

Do you know someone with a lightening fast laptop that you could ask them to plug into your router for a quick test?

One of the best increases of speed I've seen was replacing the traditional hard drive with an ssd drive. Nothing to do with the NIC, but meant the pc could deal with the info it was receiving faster.

Let us know if you have any questions.
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Re: NETWORK CARDS

Postby smeeagain » Wed Jun 19, 2013 12:55 pm

My speed at the last check/test I did, reached around the 458mbps level. So still much better than my previous ISP, but not anywhere near the reported speeds posted on this forum. One of the Tech guys did come out and install an 'upgrade', but I have not seen any significant improvement.
I do not have a second PC, other than a small netbook? And do not know of anyone with a "superfast" laptop unfortunately.
I believe I am using IE10.
So I still have my cable running through the house connected to the router and subsequently to the PC.
Without seeing any evidence to the contrary, I am loathe to purchase/install a different hard drive.
I did look into the prospect of replacing the network card, but on checking my PC ( and not being a hardware expert) I could not detect an actual "card"?
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Re: NETWORK CARDS

Postby BourneWeb » Fri Jun 21, 2013 2:09 pm

Hello youagain

Your reported speed is nothing to be sniffed at in fairness. In fact, you would struggle to find most websites that can even download to you at that speed. If most web servers have connectivity themselves at 1gb, if there is just one other user requesting something at the same time as you, that's potentially 500mb of bandwidth each to you, let alone if there were many users accessing resources.

It's a little bit like working on a racing car, changing one component at a time isn't going to get you massive improvements normally but after you've worked on each part you'll see that big increase in performance. So, don't get too het up on seeing that internet speed test dial hit the 800s because your speed is pretty impressive anyway.

However, if it's a goal of yours to get the highest speed you can there are lots of parts of this racing car you can work on! All I and others can do though is point you in the right direction and give some hints and tips.

You mention you have a trailing lead running through the house to your computer from the router yes? I presume this is an ethernet cable of some descript. You might want to give some thought around this area.

What type of cable is it?
There are commonly three types of cable about in use at the moment for the sort of networking we're talking about. You can normally see the category printed on the cable.
Cat 5 - very common, fairly cheap, but does the job. But, Cat5 only normally connects at up to 100mbps. That's only 1/10 of the speed of your fibre line. So if that's what you're using you're never going to get near the speed your router could potentially give.
Cat5e - a bit more expensive, but many more gains. This cable can actually connect up to 1000mbps (1gig). However, whilst you may get a connection negotiated at 1000mbps that doesn't mean to say the data in reality will flow at that rate.
Cat6 - this is the type of cable i like to use at the moment. It's a little thicker because it keeps the strands apart inside. This means they don't cross talk to each other. In lay terms, a nice clear corridor for the two ends to talk through.

And that's what you're trying to eliminate; cross talk. It's a bit like phoning someone years ago on a dodgy line to Australia. If you can't hear each other properly you'll have to ask the other person to keep repeating themselves which means a slower communication.

But, even with a nice fast cable, there's still other things to consider to reduce cross talk or noise on the line... as your cable passes other cabling for example. If your ethernet cable runs parallel to high voltage lines; it's like someone else shouting down the line meaning your router and your PC can't messages so well. So make sure you're well clear of extention cables, mobile phones, portable phones, microwaves etc.

If you're happy that's not limitting you, then you should probably look toward your PC, but again individual parts will probably make little difference. In order to get high speeds you're going to need an all round good machine; you might be dissappointed with individual upgrades.

I think someone else asked in an earlier post what the spec of your PC was? That would probably help getting a better understanding of what's holding your speed back.

Depending on your level of experience and willing to do upgrades yourself depending on budget etc, I'd probably look long term buying a new PC (if your current one turns out to be under powered).

or; you can do this bit by bit and make occasional upgrades yourself... that is if you want a bit of a project.

You mentioned about the Network Card (sometimes called NIC). Yes, the chances are, your PC has a built in network card on the motherboard. The network cards can either be built in like yours, or a dedicated card that often slots into the the main board at right angles.Your onboard NIC could indeed be slowing you down and getting a dedicated card could help speed things up. You can buy cards from £15 upwards. But, generally the cheaper cards won't be any better than your onboard card.

If you decide to go down the project route of upgrading your pc you could start by running the system performance test. I think in windows 7 there is a performance index which it will run and it can give you a score on each of the areas of your PC and then an overall score. You'll probably notice though that the overall score doesn't go any higher than the lowest scoring area. You can't normally operate better than your slowest component part. It's a bit like David Beckham having very agile strong legs, but if he doesn't know how to kick a ball there's not much point! Use that index to work out which are you should look to upgrade.

Think of gigler internet service as like providing a fast motorway, but you have to provide a good car and car parks at each end.

My opinion, I wouldn't worry too much. You're reporting a connectivity speed way above what most websites etc can currently support anyway. Increasing your speed rating won't make your general internet experience faster, just moving that speed test dial a little further ;)
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Re: NETWORK CARDS

Postby EddieVH » Wed Jun 26, 2013 1:16 am

A few observations:

If you're using speedtest.net to get your transfer speeds, make sure it's using the connexions4london server, shown in the bottom right of the screen.

Unless your PC has a *tiny* amount of memory, your hard disk speed is irrelevant, the speedtest.net copy doesn't touch the disk.

To elimate some factors, try removing the router, and plugging your PC directly into the ONT. (It added about 10% to my xfer speeds).

Don't get too caught up with which web browser you're using. I got this with Firefox:

Image

Don't buy cheap ethernet cables from eBay and expect them to be of decent quality. I've seen stuff that's allegedly Cat6 with no twists at all. I got the above with a bit of ordinary Belkin Cat5e.
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